Tim and Eric Interview
By Joey McGarry

How long have you been on a board with wheels? how long have you been on planet earth?

Eric:

12 years and 23 years, respectively.

Tim:

I have been alive for 40 years, 26 of which have been spent obsessing about all things skateboarding.

What's the story behind the Tim & Eric creative partnership?

Eric:

We both wanted to film a section in a local video. It seemed like less work if we split the task up.

Tim:

Not exactly sure. We both wanted to film a part for a local skate video and somehow decided to team up.

What originally sparked your journey away from traditional skateboarding tricks?

Eric:

I just like the challenge of coming up with a trick that no one else has ever done (or no one else wants to do, in most cases). There are literally millions and millions of things you can do on a skateboard and you’ll see people doing the same ten tricks over and over. Another part of it is that I could never really keep up with the traditional skateboarding tricks. Neither one of us can jump down big sets of stairs or skate big rails, but I like it like that. I want them to say “Wow, I could do all those tricks,” and if they like it then I hope they’ll be inspired and empowered to go out and think up tricks of their own. If they hate it at least they’ll leave feeling a little bit better about themselves.

Tim:

Well, for me, when I was younger, traditional skateboard tricks we're pretty dumb. A lot of standing on one hand, squatting and grabbing and putting a foot on ground. Those we're always my favorite kinds of things to do, but I swept them under the rug while I was trying to keep up with current trends. When Russ started filming for Beez, it meant I was able to revisit those dumb moves and I had more fun skateboarding during the Beez days than I had in a long, long time. Naturally I wanted to keep having fun, so I kept doing the older stuff while trying to invent new tricks along the way.

What does 'weird' mean to you? Are we born weird?

Eric:

We’re all born weird. It’s just doing what you want and not being afraid to laugh at yourself.

Tim:

Weird doesn't mean much to me. Everyone is a weirdo. Most are just closeted. The people I think are the weirdest are the ones that like current rap music. Or maybe they're just stupid. I don't know. I try real hard not to judge people, but it's hard and I still do. I wish I could stop. Are we born weird? Absolutely. Have you seen how weird a newborn baby looks?

You're going out for a filming session... What's happening in your mind?

Eric:

Not a whole lot. I try not to plan anything out too far in advance. I get too nervous if I do.

Tim:

I was just thinking about this the other day. I used to try to think of places to go and tricks to do, but I am starting to realize that doesn't work for me anymore. Now a days, I like to get to a spot someone else chooses, sit there and look at it for a while, skate a bit, look at it some more, consult with Eric, spin around until I get dizzy, throw my board at it until something feasible happens then have some unfortunate person film for 3 hours until I accidentally land and ride away.

A fellow wheeled shoeing friend sent me a link to the 'BEEZ' videos years ago and I was blown away... Do you guys have a lot of ideas left? How do you come up with some of that stuff?

Eric:

That was a little bit before my time. That’s mainly Russ’ doing. I wish there would be a Beez 4, but I have a feeling that it will probably never happen. I guess our videos are kind of an extension of Beez.

Tim:

Beez was mostly Russ Clark's brainchild. Not to say we all didn't contribute ideas, but Russ had the vision of what it was to be. I'm sure Russ still has plenty of ideas, but I think Beez has run it's course. I really try to embody the spirit of Beez for our videos for Roger, though.

Why is taking life seriously so funny?

Eric:

It is what you make of it. You have to remember that we’re all going to die eventually, so you might as well spend some time enjoying yourself before you do. I try not to take skateboarding seriously. I can go to my job and be serious or stress out when I have to pay bills. If you’re on a skateboard you should be giggling at least half the time.

Tim:

It's not so much about how people take life seriously, it's more so what they choose to worry about that's funny. Money for example. The idea of money is just dumb. It's a measurement of human worth. It ruins lives. It starts wars. And what is it? Paper. Metal. I understand you need it, but is it worth stressing out over? I've been trying to figure it out. Is it real? I can hold a 20 dollar bill in my hand and look at it, but if I take it and burn it, would anyone notice it was gone from existence? What does that make it worth? How does that national debt get paid back? In cash? A check? Money is just an idea that causes problems. I'm still trying to figure it out, but it seems like it's not worth worrying about. As far as taking life seriously, you just need to understand what's worth taking serious and what's not. It's different for everyone. But some things are worth it. Most aren't

'Too Dumb to Quit' is a great slogan... Do you have wives, babies, brothers/sisters, parents that support the idea of building a life around a board with wheels? Do you make a living off of skateboarding? How is that going?

Eric:

I don’t think my parents really understand, but they’re supportive. My girlfriend is pretty indifferent. I definitely don’t make a living off skateboarding, but I built my life around it anyways.

Tim:

I make a living as a cook in a restaurant. I also manage an apartment building so I don't have to pay rent. I make no money from skateboarding. I don't sell the product my sponsors send me. I use it all or give it to friends that may need it. Everyone in my life has supported me and what I love to do one way or another. Whether it's a friend letting me stay with them while on a trip, or my boss at work giving me time off film for the Roger video, there's been nothing but support. It's amazing.

What happened to Gorf Life? What's the story behind the mushroom dude? He looks like he's having a good time.

Eric:

There was a kid’s clothing line with the same name. I guess they weren’t too into sharing the name. I thought they should have just merged into one company. Sieben drew the mushroom blader. It’s probably the best visual representation of Gorf to date.

Tim:

Gorf Life still exists. Not in physical form, but in spirit. I guess some people just don't like it when you use the same name as them for a similar company. Mushroom blader was Michael Sieben's doing. We just asked him for a shirt design and that's what he sent us. Naturally, we loved it. Sieben can do no wrong.

Will the avant-garde in wheeled activities always be a niche thing? Or will it reach a point of refinement where it blends with the more traditional parts of the activity? Or will there always be two separate worlds?

Eric:

I suppose avant-garde by definition can’t blend with the traditional. I just hope it keeps expanding outward and getting more and more abstract. I’m excited to see what people come up with twenty years from now.

Tim:

I was always under the impression that skateboarders were naturally creative people. But as things get more popular, more people will pick it up and it will get more watered down. Not everyone can see things differently or have a creative outlook. And most people in society look for acceptance. To do things that aren't cool and current, you run the risk of being made fun of. Not everyone is ok with that. I get it. Right now skateboarding has a interesting blend of everything and there's a few people that can pull it all off seamlessly. I think the future will see more of those types of people that aren't afraid of trying something old and taking it to new levels or adding something new to it. To me that is the future. Mixing old with new, street with vert and then taking all that and doing it backwards, upside down and blindfolded.

Are you more in touch with your silliness and creativity now that you're older? Is it hard to find sometimes?

Eric:

I’m more in touch everyday. I guess it’s a journey of self discovery.

Tim:

Yes and no. It still takes a lot of thought and work, but it's easier because I'm not afraid to look like an idiot trying. And yes, some days it's just non-existent.

Have you ever thought of doing a bigger budget production? What would that be like?

Eric:

I would like to do the same thing I’m doing now, but get paid a million dollars.

Tim:

I would love to do a TV show. Just give all of my friends little segments and let them go crazy. Anything goes. Like a talent show. It would be called "Talent Show".

Combing visuals, sounds and humans doing interesting things is infinite... Everyone has the tools... Celebrity is fading, structures are breaking down, the facade of industry is fading... everyone is making stuff... Where the fuck are we going?

Eric:

Probably nowhere fast. It’s great because anyone can create something and millions of people can see it without much work or money. Being in the right place at the right time is becoming less and less important. On the other hand, it’s getting incredibly oversaturated. Everyone is making videos and everyone is good at skateboarding. We’re all just pissing in the ocean, but you know what? Pissing in the ocean is still fun.

Tim:

We're not going anywhere. And that's the problem. Too many Katy Perry's and not enough Frank Zappa's, if that makes any sense.

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